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Will the recent announcement made by government announcing a return to CPI plus 1% make a noticeable difference?

By Richard Petty

The government’s announcement that increases in social housing rents will return to CPI plus 1% for a period of five years, after the current period of rent cuts ends in March 2020, is undoubtedly welcome.

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Party Conference Season: What the Conservatives have promised to boost housing supply and increase home-ownership

By Alexandra Jezeph

Responding to the housing problem carries a new political imperative for Conservatives.   It is hard to dispute the reception of Momentum by young people, but argument over the economic sense of Labour’s housing announcements can be a moot point for those who have no capital, and therefore no stake in capitalism.  Part of Labour’s appeal is simply the offer of change.

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Central London Development - A Bumpy Ride

By Adam Challis

It is often cited that what happens in Central London ripples out through this city to the shires and countryside beyond. I have always found this analysis a bit too simplistic, but it does seem to hold weight among a few of today’s commentators.

Stop playing politics and go all in on housing policy

By Adam Challis

I have been inclined lately to proffer up yet another commentary – to add to the legion – on government plans to boost housing supply. I like to think it would be a well-reasoned critique, with a planning nip here and a land value tuck there, alongside yet another clarion call for more money. The presumption would be to spend wisely of course, these are still austere days after all – and away we go.

Except “we” never do go very far. Except housing supply never does respond very much. This, as a result, will not be that commentary.

Re-primed

By Adam Challis

After more than a year of facing some uncomfortable truths of a market on the wane, there is a change in the Prime London residential market that is worth noting. To the chorus of 'you would say that', I'm going to say it… there are signs of a market on the turn. Transactions have been driven down to record lows and despite the legion of estate agents looking to put a brave spin on things, the truth is the market has been pretty dire for most of 2016.

The Rise Of Mass Production Housing

By Adam Challis

For a Government seemingly doing and saying a lot of sensible things on housing, it isn't half taking a lot of flak for it. Is our scepticism of those in charge so high that we default to 'something must be wrong' anytime a new announcement is given? OK, fair enough – there is plenty of precedence. But maybe not this time.

Will tenants pay more rent for amenities?

By Richard Valentine-Selsey

There is an ever-growing list of amenities that can be provided within Private Rented Communities (PRCs) ranging from the functional parcel storage room or bike spaces to the aspirational private dining and cinema rooms. But what impact do they have and can they result in a rental premium?

Fighting Talk

By Adam Challis

LSE Professor Christine Whitehead recently totted up the number of new housing policy initiatives since 2010. It seems there is no shortage of energy being poured into housing initiatives, so you might expect me to be cheering a White Paper that seems increasingly likely to offer a whole new raft of ideas to work through. Based on what we know so far, I have decidedly mixed views.

Modular Construction

By Adam Challis

The next big thing for UK housing delivery is - for many - neither new, nor innovative. Yet modular is likely to drive the biggest change in the way houses get built in the UK for over a century.

Residential: What To Look Out For In 2017

By Ashley Perry

Next year’s housing white paper will hopefully cement the government’s commitment to housebuilding – but what will it mean for major London developments?

Communication. Disrupted.

By Adam Challis

The two great political events of the year, possibly of a generation, have been followed by a raft of soul searching. That much is obvious. 

But - Farage and the Brexiteers didn't invent populist rhetoric, and despite the widespread disbelief of his historic win outside of the United States, neither did Trump.